Tags

, ,


I mentioned cooking a lot of pumpkins and squash lately and using up some of the seeds in art; I also wanted to share a recipe for Pumpkin muffins. I will give the preface that there are a lot of pumpkin muffin recipes out there. There are also gluten free ones to be found. And I am sure that they are very good but I mostly get tired of sifting through recipes that have ingredients that I don’t want. And now that I weigh my flours (see note at the bottom) and know the basic amounts of other ingredients that are needed within a recipe it is often easiest to just come up with my own. And this one turned out really well making it worth sharing I think.  Not that I am against dairy but these are dairy and gluten free.

Pumpkin Spice Muffins

Dan snagged one before I could take a picture which explains the missing one.

280 grams GF flours (60% starch; I used potato starch, tapioca flour, and sweet white rice and 40% “whole grain”; I used a wee bit of potato flour with sorghum, almond and brown rice flour).

½ tsp baking soda

2 tsp baking powder

1 ½ tsp cinnamon

½ tsp ginger

¼ tsp cloves

½ tsp nutmeg

2 eggs

2/3 c. honey

¼ c. coconut oil

1 ½ c. pumpkin puree

With a food processer or beater, mix up the eggs, coconut, honey and pumpkin. Weigh and mix flours with the rest of the dry ingredients. Add the wet ingredients to the dry and mix until combined. Allow the batter sit for a few minutes to activate the baking powder and soda while greasing muffin tins. Fill each tin about ¾ full. Bake at 350 for 20-25 minutes, depending on your oven, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Enjoy!

The varying sizes is thanks to my two little helpers who scooped the batter into the tin!

This little taste tester's response after her first bite was "yummy!!" which was followed by her eating a few more...how's that for moderation?

I have mentioned weighing flours and usually give the flour amounts in grams. I first read about it here and have been weighing since about January. Honestly it works so much better than using measuring cups for the different flours because they are all so different in density and therefore weight, which makes it really hard to get an accurate mix. I go off the basis that 1 cup of all purpose flour would weigh 140 grams. So for this recipe, 280 grams of GF flours could be substituted with 2 cups of AP flour. I have tried the reverse with regular recipes and it almost always works very well. Weighing also removes the need for binders such as xanthan or guar gum, psyllium husk, or even flax seed and boiling water. My biscuits often still turn out kind of “strange and funny” as Aneliese has stated but everything else baked is usually quite tasty if I may say so. Not crumbly, not heavy, no odd flavors (unless you are used to only all purpose flour) but usually moist and tender.

I know that the latest and greatest is to only use nut or coconut flours in the gluten or grain free world and I actually often use mostly nut flours or a much higher percentage. Even these muffins could be made that ways, they would just be less fluffy and more dense. Or I do a much higher percentage of  “whole grains” (I use quotations because often what I use are actually seeds) than starches. Mostly I see baked goods as a treat to be enjoyed in moderation and I want guests who aren’t used to the different flours to also be able to enjoy what I make.

About these ads